Nations around the globe seek to prevent greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from rising with projected increases in energy demand. CHP is an affordable option to reduce energy intensity, stimulate competitiveness, and curtail carbon emissions.

DOE's technology advances and market transformation efforts have already helped to establish CHP in many large industrial applications. Continuing efforts to improve CHP reliability, efficiency, and cost effectiveness are opening new opportunities in smaller industrial applications, commercial buildings, and elsewhere.

If CHP were to supply 20% of U.S. electricity generating capacity by 2030, the projected increases in CO2 emissions would be cut by 60%.


What Is Combined Heat & Power?

CHP is an integrated set of technologies for the simultaneous, on-site production of electricity and useful heat.
The hallmark of CHP is exceptional energy efficiency. This is achieved by making use of the heat produced during power generation and avoiding the losses from transmission over the grid.
Today, CHP offers an economical way to achieve multiple national goals:
  • Save energy (more than 1.8% of annual U.S. energy use)
  • Reduce CO emissions (248 million metric tons annually)
  • Boost competitiveness, job creation, and energy security
Download the DOE PDF explaining how Co Generation can benefit the world.

Download the DOE PDF explaining how Co Generation can benefit the world.